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Sunday, September 25, 2022

POLITIXXX Profiler: An homage to the notorious RBG

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Paul Tena
Paul Tena is an alumnus of the Polytechnic University of the Philippines. He currently serves as Editor-in-Chief of Politixxx Today and he also traverses into fiction writing in his spare time. Sometimes he goes by his pen name JPE Tena. His debut novel, The Lore Kingdom, was named an Honorable Mention in 2021 Lampara Prize. For more information, you may reach him via tenajpe@gmail.com.

She’s an icon. In truth, the name Ruth Bader Ginsburg (RBG) needs no introduction. However, to remind us of the great life that she lived, we must revisit the milestones that she accomplished that definitely marked her story in democratic America.

The beginning

Born on March 15, 1933, RBG was born to immigrant parents who are both Jewish. As a native of New York, the young RBG showed a promising future. True enough, by the time she went to college, she enrolled in one of the top schools in the world, Cornell University, a member of the Ivy League. There, she met her eventual husband, Martin Ginsburg.

As the spouses Ginsburg showed stellar academic performance, they both pursued degrees in law. Notably, RBG went on to the prestigious Harvard Law School. She eventually finished at the top of her class in Columbia Law School, another Ivy League university, after her husband’s career move to the Big Apple. She did all of that while raising a family simultaneously.

The iconic rise

Though she had some of the best degrees a lawyer can ever have, RBG found it difficult to land a job. It was not because of her brains nor because of her creed, rather, it was because she was a woman. She then advocated to fight for women’s causes as a lawyer. Slowly, she gained more than enough mileage to gain her a seat in the Supreme Court.

A famous quote, attributed to her battle against sexism states: “I ask no favor for my sex; all I ask of our brethren is that they take their feet off our necks.”

Truly, RBG lived by this mantra as she worked her way to the top post that a lawyer can have. As magistrate, she pressed on liberal views and often delivered profound dissents. These factors cemented her as an icon of democracy.

President William Clinton appointed RBG as Associate Justice of the United States Supreme Court in 1993, making her the second woman to sit as Associate Justice of the United States Supreme Court in its 212 year history.

She’s notorious

Just like the late rapper Notorious B.I.G., the growing fandom of RBG tagged her with the adjective similar to that of the rapper. Of course, this is because of her fearless views and unprecedented feats to forward gender equality. She was further celebrated through memes, and quite recently, in a documentary.

One need not look further. RBG’s relatability makes her an endearing figure in the world of politics. In fact, she is undeniably a pop culture icon aside from being a renowned figure as a Justice of the US Supreme Court.

“Feminism…I think the simplest explanation, and one that captures the idea, is a song that Marlo Thomas sang, ‘Free To Be You and Me.’ Free to be, if you were a girl—doctor, lawyer, Indian chief. Anything you want to be. And if you’re a boy, and you like teaching, you like nursing, you would like to have a doll, that’s OK too. That notion that we should each be free to develop our own talents, whatever they may be, and not be held back by artificial barriers—manmade barriers, certainly not heaven sent.”

– Justice Ruth Bader Ginsberg

The legacy

President William Clinton appointed RBG as Associate Justice of the United States Supreme Court in 1993, making her the second woman to sit as Associate Justice of the United States Supreme Court in its 212 year history. Justice RBG’s efforts truly broke records. Her idealism and advocacies will create stronger impacts, not just today, but also for future generations to come. We celebrate her in this day, despite the fact that she passed away, because of her outstanding contributions to break barriers. Surely, the younger generations who are battling their own challenges will have a role model in RBG. Let’s continue to applause for a woman who gave her life to her advocacies that we can also emanate in our own lives.

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